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live classical music /
connecting with audiences

live classical music / connecting with audiences

the far flung trio

violin, accordion & double bass

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Leader of the Irish Chamber Orchestra violinist Katherine Hunka and the extraordinary accordion player Dermot Dunne have been playing together since 2007.  They were delighted to be joined by Ireland’s most sought after and versatile double bassist Malachy Robinson for a national tour in January 2014.   The trio has been invited to perform in many venues and festivals. Their concerts include Baroque to Piazzolla,  South American, Klezmer music and film classics. Their performances are packed with musical gems and are very much enjoyed by audiences with whom they engage in an entertaining way.

upcoming

The Trio will perform for Music for Galway on 25 October.

quotes & reviews

"Catherine Hunka (leader, Irish Chamber Orchestra) joined ICO colleague Malachy Robinson (double bass) and accordionist Dermot Dunne for this latest presentation by Cork Orchestra Society.

The trio’s enthusiasm and sense of enjoyment in what they were doing simply oozed from the stage and the audience loved it. This was not a ‘recital’ in the normal sense; it was more in the nature of a ‘session’ that one might hear in a very select pub or even a performance at a Fleadh Ceoil. The players arrived in their street clothes (no attempt at formal ‘concert dress’) and proceeded to entertain us with an astonishing variety of music, some familiar, played with a huge sense of joy, and performed with outstanding virtuosity.

Film music by Ennio Morricone, John Williams and Michel Legrand shared the programme with a Bulgarian suite arranged by Dunne, folk music from Russia, tangos from Argentina, fiddle music from the US, original music by the Irish-based composer Ariel Hernandez, Bottesini’s astonishing Elegy for Double Bass and Accordion, Bartok’s popular Rumanian Dances and the virtuosic Sonata Representiva by Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber (1644-1704), widely regarded as the Paganini of his time.

The latter, one of Biber’s ‘show-off’ pieces (much of his music is astonishingly virtuosic and only played by the most outstandingly brilliant, players) called on the players to create animal and bird sounds on their instruments — and it brought the house down. Finally, Dermot Dunne’s medley of popular Russian gypsy tunes, ending with Kalinka, ensured that several encores were called for and freely given."
- Declan Townsend, Irish Examiner 10 May 2014.

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